2000 Daimler Super V8

Part 2 - Some TLC

 

 

Rear bumper removal:



 

I actually tackled this job soon after I bought the car even though when viewed from the rear, the bumper was dead level with very even gaps on each side, as I wanted to see what condition the hidden metalwork was in, not forgetting what might be happening to the oft mentioned mounting brackets. There are only the two large through bolts and the wiring connector for the reversing sensors to remove, then the whole assembly can be pulled from the side mounts and away from the body. I took the precaution of applying 2 layers of masking tape along the sides of the body to prevent scratching anything, as I was on my own for this task.

Needless to say the monkey metal mounts were in a poor state, quite corroded but still surviving although if they were to let go, due to the positive wind pressure under the scoop of the rear bumper, there is nothing to stop the whole assembly from taking flight, possibly with serious consequences, requiring more than just a new bumper. Seems to me, as an engineer that the accountants overruled the practical folk on that design aspect too.

Anyway, as my bumper gap was parallel and the mounts were intact, I decided to make 2 new non adjustable centre columns with a flange incorporated at the correct position, as measured from the originals; this would get rid of the very poor aluminium alloy parts forever. I happened to have a chunk of phosphor bronze of the right size (and a large centre lathe!) to make 2 and in order to locate them in the original GRP mounting blocks, I used a strap of stainless steel with 2 stainless self tappers through the sides. This meant that my screws would be in shear rather than relying on an end fitted rusty mild steel screw into a shoddy 'plastic' bit.



 

My system will only work of you are happy with the initial bumper height and your mountings haven't completely disintegrated, if that’s the case then some careful measurement and detective work will be needed to ensure that you end up with the correct height; no adjustment will be possible later, other than by machining a bit off one end and adding an equivalent piece to the other end somehow, although glue would actually suffice, as when the through bolt is in position nothing can come adrift.


Yes, I could have replicated the centre column adjustment system, but that would have involved lots of work just for one occasion, then left for ever in that position. I could also have bought 2 new units and carefully protected them, as Jaguar should have done in the first place. I think new mountings should have been given away in a weekly competition by Jaguar, first prize, one mounting and second prize - two!


Whilst the bumper was off I injected Bilt Hamber S50 into every visible cavity and all around the many seams and overlaps but I was very pleasantly surprised at the overall condition, bearing in mind that my car is now more than 15 years old.

    

 

I took the car off the road at the end of October for the Winter and decided to do a bit of investigative work around to front end to see if there was anything festering behind panels or in hidden places which might need some remedial work.  The first to be removed was the undertray and wheel arch liners, which came away without drama.  Next off were the grill, headlamp surrounds, air ducts and lower chrome grill splitter.  This meant that the bumper could come off next - it would be good to see what condition the notorious mounts were in.  The long through bolts were easy enough but even with those removed, although the bumper was obviously loose, I couldn't seem to draw it off the mountings.  I had not realised that the steel spacers which the large bolts pass through are actually free (although not very) to move in the lower section of the beam and due to the height of the adjustment on my bumper, these spacers were high enough to jam inside the aluminium castings on the mounts.  I struggled in the very limited space available to remove the 3 bolts on each side which hold the mounting brackets to the front panel.  I was then able to lower the whole assembly to the floor to disconnect the harness plugs.  One of the mountings then came away very easily, but the other was still not for giving up.  Eventually I got a 14mm taper tap and wound it gently into the spacer and as soon as it started to bind up, the spacer rotated and could easily be withdrawn - if I had known it was the spacer that was holding it all and that they were not part of the beam, I might still have all of the skin on my wrists and knuckles!

The aforementioned mountings were in excellent condition and even the large threaded inner adjusters were still free.  Only the mickey-mouse torx screws were rusty but even they came out without resorting to bad language.  I will not remake the metal parts of the mountings as I did on the rears but will instead clean them up and coat them liberally with copper grease, after replacing the torx screws with stainless self tappers of course.  I don't think they will give further trouble in my ownership, especially the front ones as they are shielded from the worst of the weather, unlike the rears which are in the firing line of any salt spray encouraged by the scoop of the rear bumper to do its worst.

 

The wings were very easily removed with just nine bolts:

1 off in the rear lower edge on the sill top

2 off in the A post

2 off in the front end holding it to the lower section of the inner wing

4 off in the flange along the top edge

 

There is also a short run (about 2") of seam sealer holding the very rear of the wing just in front of the windscreen at the end of the plenum/scuttle cover - parted with a backed razor blade.

 

 

This is the inside of the nearside wing, almost as good as the day it was fitted.  The darker patch above the arch which extends to just above the swage line is where the simple arch liner fits against - this will come in for a good liberal coat of underbody wax.  Regular cleaning will help keep this vulnerable area free from salt laden crud.

 

Once removed, the wings were cleaned off inside and treated with Bilt Hamber S50. as was the inner wheel arch and the box section along the top edge of the inner wing.  There is a series of access holes in this box section, covered with adhesive tape which, after nearly 15 years had failed.   Following liberal injection of cavity wax and then cleaning the surrounding areas, I refitted small squares of 'Gorilla' tape over the holes. The rear flanges of the front wings are made in 2 pieces, spot welded together down the whole length, so they came in for extra treatment, both inside the wing and outside by the door shut, to prevent any corrosion creeping in between the welds.

 

 

The spot welds are clearly seen here, so far with no corrosion issues and I hope to keep it that way as long as I am the custodian.

 

I removed the electrical multi plug at the lower end of the 'A' post which brings power from inside the car to the front end services, in order to check for any green (corroded) terminals but all was pristine, so I smeared a small amount of dielectric grease over the pins and fitted it back, before replacing the outer wing again - all very straightforward.  I spent some time with the workshop vacuum, removing countless dead insects and leaves from the face of the radiator and the power steering pipe cooling fin wires. 

 

 

This shot shows the multi plug for the front harness and the condition of the top of the forward end of the sill - no corrosion issues around this well known trouble spot.

Everything looked fine around the front end of the chassis legs, so after a good blast with cavity wax it was time to replace the bumper mounts, followed by the bumper itself.  I protected the lower edges of the front wings with tape, as I was on my own replacing the bumper - in the event it engaged on both sliders and went on to the mounts in one easy operation, ready for the liberally greased bolts to be fitted from under the bumper.

Now for the front end:

 

I decide to make a tool for adjusting the centre column of the mounting so that I could adjust the height of the bumper relative to the grill and wings without taking it off and on many times; this was a relatively simple turning job on the lathe and the drive dogs were just cut with a saw then filed to fit and then the centre spigot was pressed in afterwards. Like many of the tools I make to help things along more easily, I then zinc plated it - yes, perhaps I should sell my anorak and get out more, but I was already plating a batch of fittings for another motorcycle I'm restoring.

The insides of the wings were almost as good as the day they were fitted. Regular cleaning will help keep these vulnerable areas free from crud in the future.

Once removed, the wings were cleaned off inside and treated with Bilt Hamber S50. as was the inner wheel arch and the box section along the top edge of the inner wing. There is a series of access holes in this box section, covered with adhesive tape which, after nearly 15 years had failed. Following liberal injection of cavity wax and then cleaning the surrounding areas, I refitted small squares of 'Gorilla' tape over these access holes.

The rear flange of the front wing just in front of the door is made in 2 pieces, spot welded together down the whole length, so they came in for extra treatment, both inside the wing and outside by the door shut, to prevent any corrosion creeping in between the welds.

Everything looked fine around the front end of the chassis legs, so after a good soaking with cavity wax it was time to replace the bumper mounts, followed by the bumper itself. I protected the lower edges of the front wings with tape, as I was on my own replacing the bumper - in the event it engaged on both sliders and went on to the mounts in one easy operation. Next was the precise adjustment for height using the home made tool, as my front bumper was a little on the high side when I first got the car. Then it was time for the liberally greased bolts to be fitted from under the bumper.

Quite a satisfying job completed and I now know that those areas will not give any cause for concern for many years to come. Prevention of serious corrosion on our cars is far and away cheaper than remedial cutting and welding in later years. Usually at the age of my car (2000 model year) it would be too late but having been carefully used for most of the time, it has not suffered the fate of many similar aged vehicles.

In one or two places underneath there are some innocent looking stains on otherwise intact undersealing, I can nearly guarantee that the sealer has somehow been compromised and there is some corrosion present behind it. What kind of sub standard under seal had Jaguar been using? Was it of their own manufacture or had they been supplied with some cheap rubbish at the behest of the bean counters? Perhaps it came as a job-lot with the metal for the bumper mounts.

 

 

Next job on the list was the sills; another notorious problem area so I wanted to pump them with another Bilt Hamber product, Dynax UB which is an almost black anti corrosion wax and comes in 750 ml aerosols with incredible pressure. Bilt Hamber also supply a long flexible 'lance' with a clever little slotted stop end which really projects the product in a full circle to ensure complete coverage.

The very thin stainless inlay panels with the Daimler logo are attached to the sill tread plates with double sided foam tape and these need to be removed to gain access to the torx screws which hold the tread plates to the sill top. The problem is they are very thin and quite a neat fit in the tread plate. I first removed the little plastic end finisher and applied a little heat from a hot air gun to soften the adhesive tape and with a backed razor blade, was able to gently lift the end of the finisher. Having already protected the anodised finish on the tread plate with masking tape it was then fairly easy to push a thin scraper blade under the finisher and remove the razor blade. Patience is required for this operation and the scraper blade together with the heat gun can be slowly advanced to the other end until the whole finisher is released.

The number 30 size Torx screws are next and there are 3 on the front plates but 6 on the slightly shorter rears - a strange arrangement and I'm not sure how many there are on the short wheelbase models. Another thing which must have been missed by the cost cutters is that the hole pattern on the rears is asymmetrical, so therefore they are handed but could easily have had symmetry.

 

The ‘magic lance’ was fed into the holes at different positions and persuaded to go in the direction desired, it was then just a matter of slowly withdrawing the lance tube whilst pressing the aerosol button and being careful to stop pressing before it emerged from the hole - it takes about 3 good very soapy washes to get it off your face!

I had spread some long strips of cardboard under the sills to catch the run out from the sill vent holes

 

 

 

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